Dynium is digitising
the orchard.

Using advanced robotics, we develop vision-based crop analytics systems. These reduce farmer costs, alleviate risks,
increase yields and improve the sustainability of fruit production.

Challenge

The challenge

The two tenets of the fruit sector are product consistency and supply reliability. When sourcing fruit, they are the values
 upon which buyers, co-operatives, packhouses, processors and supermarkets rely.

 

Farms find it difficult to accurately predict the amount of fruit they will have available to sell after harvest.

Whether they’re growing apples, pears, grapes or citrus,
the challenge is the same.

Storage volumes, logistics, packhouse capacities and labour requirements are all determined by the amount of fruit.

Farmers have to make these plans without accurate
 estimates of how much fruit they’ll have.

Farms find it difficult to accurately predict the amount of fruit they will have available to sell after harvest.

Whether they’re growing apples, pears, plums or citrus,
the challenge is the same.

Storage volumes, logistics, packhouse capacities and labour requirements are all determined by the amount of fruit.

Farmers have to make these plans without accurate
 estimates of how much fruit they’ll have.

The Solution

To solve the challenge, we’ve taken techniques developed for driverless cars – computer vision,
image analysis, machine learning – and applied our own, in-house yield-analytics algorithms to
 develop an autonomous, digital orchard management system.

The result?

With Dynium’s CropScout robot, growers can easily and accurately estimate the amount of fruit they have available to sell.

CropScout further improves orchard productivity by detecting disease and monitoring irrigation.

CropScout requires minimal user intervention, yet provides alerts and actionable insights through an easy-to-use, feature-rich and device-independent interface.

Core Values

Dynium: our values

In agriculture, there’s always room for improvement.

More food, less waste, lower costs, more efficient resource use and better environmental performance: these are the values against which we judge agricultural productivity.

Dynium believes digital technologies provide the best route to improved agricultural productivity and sustainability

Specifically, we believe in a future where autonomous smart vehicles become the indispensable connection between crops and the digital cloud. The agricultural robots market is projected to grow from $7.4bn in 2020 to $20.6bn in 2025.

Dynium’s systems employ driverless-car platforms, adapting them for the orchard environment. Our approach uses proven  technology to provide a dependable, robust yet affordable management solution: the digital orchard

History and location

Dynium was founded in January 2016. Our Development Office
is in Oxford, in the United Kingdom.

Ranked number four worldwide for agritech investment, the UK possesses a vibrant agritech ecosystem and a national strategy – bringing together government agencies, academic institutions, start-ups and end-users –
 to encourage the development and adoption of new agricultural technologies.

Oxford, home to the renowned Oxford Robotics Institute, enjoys its reputation both as Europe’s leading city for autonomous robotics development and a world-class centre for artificial intelligence. British start-ups account around
for six per cent of the global robotics market.

While Oxford hosts all our software and hardware development, a Development Farm in Herefordshire – one of the UK’s prime fruit and cropping regions – provides a valuable testing ground for CropScout and Dynium’s other projects.

 

People

People behind dynium

Charles Kirby

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Dr Christopher Marshall

chief technology officer

Dr Christopher Marshall

CHIEF Technology OFFICER

With a multitude of experience across start-ups as well as multinational engineering companies, Chris has dedicated his life to implementing AI and machine learning systems.

Applying his skills and knowledge to industries as diverse as quantitative trading and nuclear robotics, Chris has managed engineering teams and developed complex AI based platforms for the last 15 years.

With a Master’s in Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronics from Newcastle University, and a Ph.D. in Computer Vision for Robotics, Chris is the lead on Dynium’s computer vision and autonomous robotics technical development.

Charles Kirby

Chief executive Officer

Charles was working for a motorsports engineering firm at the world-famous Silverstone, home of the British F1 Grand Prix, when he realised the concept for Dynium Robot.

From a fruit-growing family, Charles recognised the labour issues facing many farmers: recruitment, skills retention and rising employment costs. Meanwhile, his experience developing automotive networking protocols – with a particular emphasis on robustness and drive-by-wire – suggested that autonomous robotics technology presented significant opportunities.

Dynium Robot was the result.

Charles holds degrees in Electronic Engineering from Warwick University, in Economic History from the London School of Economics and a Master’s in Management, Innovation and Entrepreneurship from Imperial College Business School.

dynium TEAM